19.4.08

Default: goto(hell);

It's fairly common to hear people say that they're good enough to get into heaven.  Most of them would argue that their good works are what gets them into heaven; however, their main problem is that they think of heaven as the default case.  

"Default case" is a programmer's term used to describe, well, the default case.  In programming there's a thing in most languages called "select case".  It is basically a big IF-THEN structure. I'll show you an example:

IF-THEN structure:
if a = b then
    do THIS
else
    if a = c then
        do THAT
    else
        if a = d then
            do THEOTHER
        else
            do WHATEVER
        endif
    endif
endif

Select Case structure:
select case a
case b:
    do THIS
    break
case c:
    do THAT
    break
case d:
    do THEOTHER
    break
Default:
    do WHATEVER
end select

("break" tells the program to skip the rest of the stuff in the select.  If I didn't put the breaks in, and a = b, then the computer would do THIS, THAT, THEOTHER, and WHATEVER.  Yeah, it's kinda dumb, but it's useful.)

See?  People think that if they just live life and aren't mean very much, and do some good stuff, they'll go to heaven.  If they do bad stuff, like murder, then maybe they've been bad enough to go to hell.  Their idea of life is something like this:

select case Me
case Murdered:
    goto(hell)
    break
case Embezzled:
    if AmountEmbezzled > 1000000 then
        goto(hell)
    else
        goto(heaven)
    break
Default:
    goto(heaven)
end select

Whereas reality is:

select case Me
case Elect:
    goto(heaven)
    break
Default:
    goto(hell)
end select

Big difference, eh?

(yeah, I admit, as I have before, to being a nerd =])

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